Matching Your Clothes Made Easy

One of the biggest questions we get from our customers is on how to match clothes correctly. I mean, there must be a secret combination or method to doing this right? No matter how well cut your shirt is or what incredible fabric your trousers are made from, if you don’t match your clothes right you can ruin an entire ensemble. Matching colours is hard for most people so don’t worry about making a mistake, but there are easy ways to avoid a fashion faux pas and help you look your best

White is always right

White is always right
A white shirt will always go with anything. So, if you’ve bought a new pair of plaid or printed pants that you’re not sure how to wear, just pair them with a white shirt and nine times out of 10, you’ll look great. Keeping in this vein, you can also trust that neutrals will pair well with neutrals so a black shirt with brown trousers or a grey shirt with white khakis are safe options to go with. Always have your basics in neutral colours so you can mix and match these with brighter, more statement pieces.

Tonal Dressing

Tonal Dressing
Another fun way to match is to stick to one tone. This means you could wear a grey shirt with black trousers and a black blazer, or tan trousers with a beige shirt and tweed jacket. These looks work very well for casual wear, such as a light blue shirt with dark blue jeans or a pink shirt with red shorts. Keeping your clothes within one colour family make it pretty difficult to mess up your matching!

Use the Colour Wheel

Use the colour wheel
Now this can get a little technical but bear with us. The colour wheel was invented in the 17th century by Sir Isaac Newton and encompasses the foundation for all colour theory Here you will see the three primary colours; red, blue and yellow which cannot be created by mixing anything. These then expand into hues within each spectrum. The closer colours are to each other, the easier they are to match. For example, a yellow shirt with lime green stripes is a better bet than a yellow shirt with red stripes. Colours that are directly opposite each other can also work well together if you’re more adventurous. So your dark blue jeans would look really good with a yellow or mustard shirt, contrary to what you may think!

Core, Accent and Complement

Core, Accent and Complement
A good way to identify which colours and pieces of clothing need to match is by separating them into three categories. Your core is the dominant colour and will usually be your jacket or trousers. The accent colour is the next most obvious colour so perhaps your shirt or sweater. The third category is complementary colour which would be a tie or pair of socks. This is the area where you want to pick colours that are opposite to each other on the wheel. So a burgundy blazer with a green pocket square, for example.

Colour wheel

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